An Offer You Cannot Refuse: A Glimpse Into the Best Crime Films of All Time

Image Credit: Hdbitz.org
Ever since The Great Train Robbery and The Musketeers of Pig Alley from way back in the silent era, audiences have thrilled to the spectacle of desperate law-breaking types going about their sordid business on screen. From the early gangster talkies by Warner Brothers, to the 40s/50s film noir boom with its world weary heist men and con artists, to the 1970s genre renaissance and on to our own modern era of sardonic hit-men, conflicted drug-lords and people being fed to woodchippers, the crime film is here to stay, and has produced some of the most memorable, hard hitting and poignant films there are. For the record, here are the five best.
An Offer You Cannot Refuse: A Glimpse Into the Best Crime Films of All Time
Image Credit: Hdbitz.org
Ever since The Great Train Robbery and The Musketeers of Pig Alley from way back in the silent era, audiences have thrilled to the spectacle of desperate law-breaking types going about their sordid business on screen. From the early gangster talkies by Warner Brothers, to the 40s/50s film noir boom with its world weary heist men and con artists, to the 1970s genre renaissance and on to our own modern era of sardonic hit-men, conflicted drug-lords and people being fed to woodchippers, the crime film is here to stay, and has produced some of the most memorable, hard hitting and poignant films there are. For the record, here are the five best.
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Honorable Mention

Heat (1995) – Michael Mann’s stunner puts DeNiro and Pacino in the same shot for the first time. The excellent climactic shootout also does not harm its case. The Usual Suspects (1995) – Bryan Singer’s twisty ensemble made a huge splash as did Kevin Spacey’s Verbal Kint/ Keyser Soze (spoiler).


Miller’s Crossing (1990) – Choosing from the Coen Brothers catalogue is tough as they’ve also given us Fargo and No Country For Old Men, but this prohibition era tale wins on all around charm


Scarface (1983) – It must be included if only for the iconic status of Pacino’s performance and the film itself, if for nothing else.


The French Connection (1971) – William Friedkin’s classic Best Picture sees Gene Hackman’s Popeye Doyle on the trail of heroin smugglers, the beginning of what’s arguably the greatest decade in crime cinema.


L.A. Confidential (1997) – Quite criminally passed over for Best Picture by Titanic, this gorgeous flick has great performances from all involved (Russell Crowe, Kevin Spacey, Guy Pearce, Kim Basinger) and a killer script to boot.


City Of God (2002) – A chronicle of spreading street and organized crime in Rio de Janeiro — raw and terrifying.


That’s our take on the greatest crime films. You’re welcome to try and top it.


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